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Archive of: Did You Know?

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City Island's Bath House

City Island's Bath House

Like a dowager fallen upon hard times, diminished by age and dressed in faded and timeworn clothing, struggling to maintain her dignity in an urban environment that disregards her former splendor with more contemporary attire, the Bath House stands tranquilly at the north end of City Island.

December 2014
Monument to a Little-Remembered War

Monument to a Little-Remembered War

The statue of Victory gazes serenely from her perch five stories above the intersection of Third and Walnut streets on a column of marble – dedicated to a war that is, relatively, little-remembered compared to others in Pennsylvania history.

November 2014
Old Shaky

Old Shaky

The Walnut Street Bridge has been a source of discussion for a large part of its 125-year existence. No one seems to know when it acquired the affectionate title of “Old Shaky,” but it may hark back to the days when trolley cars rattled across its metal spans between 1893 and 1936, allowing passengers to transit between the east and west shores of the Susquehanna River before it later became a walkway for pedestrians and bicyclists. Since 1996, it has been only a memory for those perambulators either on foot or pedaling between City Island and Wormleysburg.

September 2014
Hiding In Plain Sight

Hiding In Plain Sight

If you travel up north 13th Street to Liberty Street, you will arrive at the entrance to the Harrisburg Cemetery. Passing through the gates of this historic resting place for many notable city residents (as long as it’s between the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.), you will enter a world far removed from its surroundings.

July 2014
How Many Hickoks?

How Many Hickoks?

How many Hickoks does it take to run a family-owned business in Harrisburg continuously for 170 years?

June 2014
Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Patrons on Harrisburg’s 2nd Street Restaurant Row have certainly passed by it, and some may have stopped to admire its workmanship and decidedly different architecture. Most have little idea what it represents. Sandwiched between Tom Sawyers’ diner-like façade and Capitol Shoe Repair is a remarkable brownstone portal impossible to reproduce and certainly more elegant than the entryways of its neighbors.

March 2014
The Missing Marker

The Missing Marker

Harrisburg is a city with many historical markers. They exist in places where they may be expected and in places that take casual observers by surprise. If you look near the west end of the Walnut Street People’s Bridge on City Island, you will find one that is accurate and yet slightly ambiguous. It’s the marker for the renowned Harrisburg Giants baseball team.

February 2014
Did You Know?

Did You Know?

By their very nature, monuments are solid objects permanently placed to remind us of the past, and Harrisburg, as well as the Central Pennsylvania area, is rich with granite and marble memorials to people and events that serve as silent reminders of the area’s story. A stroll on the grounds of the capitol complex provides an array of edifices erected to those people and events that constitute our history. A walk down Front Street, along the Susquehanna River, offers even more confirmation of the desire to remember past events and personages. However, if one travels uptown, a monument exists on the corner of Third and Division streets that has a more curious history than any other in the city.

December 2013
The End of the Line-Literally

The End of the Line-Literally

Ever since John Harris put his ferry in the waters of the Susquehanna, people have been looking for ways to get to and from the West Shore. As the longest commercially non-navigable river in North America, the Susquehanna has numerous bridges crossing it, from its origin in Otsego Lake, New York to its terminus into the Chesapeake Bay. However, eight forsaken bridge piers standing like taciturn sentinels in the river at Harrisburg denote the end of the line – literally – in a notorious chapter of Pennsylvania history.

November 2013
What Lies Beneath Market Square?

What Lies Beneath Market Square?

Architecture and development have coexisted uneasily throughout the history of Harrisburg. The city seems to be in a constant state of oscillation with new construction attempting to supplant existing structures in a struggle for valuable space defined by the boundaries of areas described as downtown, midtown, uptown and the like. No portion of the city has had a more visible battleground than that of Market Square.

October 2013
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