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Mary Ellen Mark—Tiny: Streetwise Revisited

Feb 23, 2017 - Mar 19, 2017

Renowned photographer Mary Ellen Mark (1940–2015) began a project called Streetwise, which became a poignant document of a fiercely independent group of homeless and troubled youth who made their way on the streets of Seattle as pimps, prostitutes, panhandlers, and small-time drug dealers. Streetwise introduced several unforgettable children, including Tiny, who dreamed of a horse farm,...

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"Off the Page" Exhibition

Feb 23, 2017 - Mar 4, 2017

This exhibition will feature visual artwork based on text from fairy tales, the Bible, novels, poems, speeches, and more. See how this collection of artists brings the written word to life through their own unique visual interpretations. Join us for the opening reception on Feb. 10, 6-8:30 p.m., to meet the participating artists and enjoy light refreshments.

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"One Ground Beetle" Exhibition

Feb 23, 2017 - May 6, 2017

View this collaboration between poet Melody Davis and printmaker Harold Lohner. Inspired by a selection of Davis’ haiku poems, written daily for 150 days, Lohner carved potatoes to create prints, finalizing them with digital media. Join us for the opening reception on Feb. 10, 6-8:30 p.m., to meet the artists and enjoy light refreshments.

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"Almost Maine"

Feb 23, 2017 - Feb 26, 2017

This event occurs daily, every 1 day(s).

On a cold, clear, moonless night in the middle of winter, all is not quite what it seems in the remote, mythical town of Almost, Maine. In John Cariani’s charming episodic play, Almost’s residents find themselves falling in and out of love in unexpected and often hilarious ways. “Sweet, poignant and witty. Nearly perfect,” says the New York Daily News. 

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R.U.R

Feb 23, 2017 - Feb 26, 2017

In 1921, Czech playwright Karel Capek published his play, RUR: Rossum’s Universal Robots, to the world. The dark comedy took as its theme the dehumanization of society by its technology, as well as the self-destructive nature of mankind’s all-encompassing drive toward automation. Two years later, in 1923, the play had been translated into over 30 languages including English, by Paul Selver...

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