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Nov 26, 201210:11 AMHomes & Gardens

All things home and garden

Water, Water Everywhere

Nov 26, 2012 - 10:11 AM
Water, Water Everywhere

I ran downstairs on Saturday to check on the progress of a scan I was running on a client computer. As I got to the bottom step, an unusual noise caught my attention. It was the sump pump merrily doing what it was meant to do – emptying the water out of the sump pit.

Problem was; it hadn’t rained for over two weeks.

I investigated and discovered that the plastic drain valve on the hot water storage tank had a pin-hole leak in it. The casting had cracked, and water was spraying a fairly large stream of water onto the concrete floor.

As good sense dictated, I waited until the girls had all taken their showers and had left the house to do some shopping before tinkering with their water supply. Then I gathered the tools and supplies.

As good sense dictated, I waited until the girls had all taken their showers and had left the house to do some shopping before tinkering with their water supply.

Being the packrat that I am (just ask my wife), I went through the ‘plumbing’ drawer of the one chest and found that I did, indeed, have a 3/4” boiler drain that I could use to replace the faulty one on the tank.

This one is made of bronze, giving it a better life than the old plastic one.

Experience taught me I would probably also need to gather some wrenches and Teflon tape.

I began by shutting off the water supply and the hot water line to the tank. I also shut off the lines to and from the boiler, and cut the electrical power to the boiler and the circulating pump.

Again from experience, I was sure to check  for leaks around the new valve, and thankfully to my relief, found none.

Next, I connected a garden hose to the tank and drained it into the sump pit. It was only then that I gently removed the old plastic drain valve.

After carefully wrapping the threads of the new bronze valve with Teflon tape, I put it in place. I finished the project by tightening the valve with a wrench to a snug fit, I opened the supply and hot water lines.

Again from experience, I was sure to check  for leaks around the new valve, and thankfully to my relief, found none.

Feeling secure in my sense of handiwork, I opened the hot water valve on the sink and tub to bleed off any air that may have gotten into the pipes during the valve replacement process. Satisfied that the lines were clear, I only then opened the valves to the boiler and restored electric to the boiler and pump.

After carefully wrapping the threads of the new bronze valve with Teflon tape, I put it in place. I finished the project by tightening the valve with a wrench to a snug fit.

And that was it.

In less than a half of an hour, the leak was repaired and disaster averted.

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